Health

Latino kids playing in playground

Researchers: Lack of play spaces ups obesity risk for Latino kids

January 12, 2016
 

Latinos have limited spaces to be physically active, which contributes to obesity rates in Latino kids, but sharing recreational facilities and creating walkable neighborhoods are promising solutions, according to a new package of research from Salud America!, a national network for Latino childhood obesity prevention based at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio.

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Health is why

December 14, 2015
 

Several teams from the Health Science Center participated in the 2015 San Antonio Heart & Stroke Walk held Dec. 12 at Nelson Wolff Stadium.

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Research teams present findings at Breast Cancer Symposium

December 14, 2015
 

Research studies conducted by the CTRC and School of Medicine of the Health Science Center were presented during the 38th annual AACR-CTRC San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium held Dec. 8-12 at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center.

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Edward Ellis III, D.D.S., M.S.

Changing faces, improving lives

November 19, 2015
 

Summers in Grand Haven, Mich., were great for Edward Ellis III, D.D.S., M.S. “When I was in high school and college, my summer job was to run the concession stand my father owned at Grand Haven State Park. In fact, I lived in a nice apartment above the concession stand during those months,” he said. […]

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pregnancy

Report: No amount of alcohol safe for pregnant women

November 4, 2015
 

A new clinical report co-authored by Janet F. Williams, M.D., FAAP, professor of pediatrics in the School of Medicine at the Health Science Center, identifies prenatal exposure to alcohol as the leading preventable cause of birth defects and intellectual and neurodevelopmental disabilities in children.

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Nurse Giving Patient Injection

Report: Time can change benefits of therapies

November 4, 2015
 

After breast cancer surgery, women are prescribed adjuvant (or follow-up) therapies such as chemotherapy to reduce the risk of the cancer returning. It’s been assumed that the treatment effects of these therapies remain constant over time, but a new study from the CTRC suggests the opposite is true.

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